SEM 700R WEEK 2 Scholarly Writing Activity

SEM 700R WEEK 2 Scholarly Writing Activity

 

 

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SEM 700R WEEK 2 Scholarly Writing Activity

SEM 700R WEEK 2 Scholarly Writing Activity

SEM 700R WEEK 2 Scholarly Writing Activity

Scholarly Writing Activity

Instructions:

Read the University of Phoenix Material: Scholarly Writing on the student website.

Reflect on the following quote on critical thinking by Richard Paul and Michael Scriven.

Critical thinking — in being responsive to variable subject matter, issues, and purposes — is incorporated in a family of interwoven modes of thinking, among them: scientific thinking, mathematical thinking, historical thinking, anthropological thinking, economic thinking, moral thinking, and philosophical thinking. 

Read the low-rigor and high-rigor passages below and complete the following tables.

 

Low-Rigor Passage

Note. The following references have been fabricated for this sample passage.

For centuries people have been debating whether leaders are born or made. Perhaps leaders are both. There are hundreds of different leadership styles, and they can all be effective depending on the leader and the situation. Leaders can choose which style is best for their particular needs. According to Koffer (2007), situational leadership is the preferred leadership style among executives in multinational companies. As society becomes increasingly global, leaders must have situational leadership skills to remain competitive and achieve the mission. Global organizations can greatly benefit when leaders use the situational style. The situational style is just one of many styles, but it has advantages that other styles do not have. In a global market, situational leadership is necessary for success.

 

Low-Rigor Indicators Examples From the Text

Copy and paste phrases or sentences from the low-rigor passage.

Why is this low-rigor indicator an issue?
Vague Statements
Unsupported Opinions
Inadequate Explanations

 

High-Rigor Passage

Note. The following references have been fabricated for this sample passage.

Twenty-first century leaders may choose from many leadership styles, including transformational, situational, and servant leadership. While all these styles can be effective, Koffer (2007) found situational leadership to be the most favored style in multinational organizations. According to Koffer, situational leaders are those who can adapt their behaviors to changing circumstances. For example, a situational leader might provide intensive coaching and supervision to unify two groups of employees after a merger. However, as the team becomes unified, the leader offers less supervision and requires the employees to be more self-sufficient. This adaptive leadership style can be especially beneficial in global companies as leaders modify their behaviors to accommodate culturally and geographically diverse workforces (Ming-Lee, 2008).

High-Rigor Indicators Examples From the Text

Copy and paste phrases or sentences from the high-rigor passage.

Elements I need to remind myself of as I improve my scholarly writing.
Ideas Supported by Research
Explanations of Key Concepts
Examples to Illustrate Ideas

 

Resources: Ch. 1 and 2 Wellington text and Ch. 1-4 of the Goodson Text

Write one-paragraph to complete each of the following prompts using critical thinking as framed by Richard Paul within the context of scholarly writing.

  • In a comparison of high-rigor and low-rigor writing practices, I found the following similarities, differences and distinctions evident…
  • In evaluating the similarities and differences of low-rigor and high-rigor the following conclusions can be developed…
  • The following recommendations for my own future writing practices and developing my voice as a scholar are based on the analysis and evaluations of high- and low-rigor writing…

V020518

SEM 700R WEEK 2 Scholarly Writing Activity

 

 

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